Waiting For The Fog To Lift

Yesterday Mr. Knitting Sarah had a day off and we decided to take the day to have a little adventure, to see what we could see out there in this late summer world. As it was scheduled to be a scorcher, Mr. KS proposed we set alarms, get up early, and head down to Necedah National Wildlife Refuge before the heat of the day set in. We prepped the kids, warning them of the expectation to be up and out the door early, and let them know what they needed to bring — book/s, binoculars, hat, water — and what they needed to leave at home — screens, complaining, general impatience. When morning came, things went mostly according to plan and we were on the road by 6:30am.

Necedah National Wildlife Refuge has a good variety of hiking trails, but they also have a wonderful network of mostly maintained gravel and sand roads to traverse by car. These roads are pretty good for wildlife spotting as they are largely unused and go through some rather untrammeled areas. It’s been a long time coming that I admit the full extent of the mileage limitations I have for what I can cover by foot, but I am learning — slowly, but surely — accept those as my reality. And Necedah is one of those places that I can still enjoy being outdoors, still experience a certain level of wilderness without the stress on my body.

In any case, we did a meandering drive through the Refuge, spotting a few fawns and deer, an immature Hood Merganser, lots of Turkeys with their youngsters in tow, and had one close encounter with a Red-Tailed Hawk that literally flew along side the car for a short time. After an hour or so, we headed up to a wildlife viewing tower and we gazed out over thick fog…

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And we waited. We brought our picnic lunch and even though it was early, we dug in. As we munched our simple meal of sandwiches and veggies and chips, we listened to the Sora, watched a pair of Sandhill Cranes foraging, and spotted a little fawn half-hiding half-perusing the edibles around him in the thicket below us. Somewhere hidden in the fog, we heard the unmistakable call of Trumpeter Swans — ko-hoh! ko-hoh! We waited.

The fog slowly began to lift…

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And we spotted Canada Geese…

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And a pair of Trumpeter Swans farther out. The kids began to lose patience so we sent them off to run the trails below while we stayed and watched the sun slowly burn through the veil of fog.

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Even Moose was interested to see what secrets would be revealed…

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And before we knew it…

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The fog had all but lifted, the temperature had climbed considerably, and it was time to try out a new trail. After a nice smoldering hike, we piled into the car and Mr. KS googled an ice cream stop after which we made a quick detour to check out the petroglyphs at Roche-A-Cri State Park. It’s a rock outcropping, once an island of Cambrian sandstone jutting out of Glacial Lake Wisconsin.

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It’s still a pretty impressive hunk of rock and one I share because I don’t know that many people know these kinds of things exist in Wisconsin. I assure you, they do.

We stopped at another little wayside along a new way home that had similar geology and our daughter found a Five-Lined Skink…

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Such a beautiful little lizard, a native of our state but the first we’ve seen. How lucky we were to have found him on a random whim of a stop!

We got back home in the mid-afternoon and enjoyed and early dinner and a movie. I spun…

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This is Butte Shadows on Rambouillet from Three Waters Farm. I am behind on starting my TWF Handspun Sweater-along spin and this spin was another impulsive delay. Beautiful and fun and I love it, but a delay nonetheless.

I’m not quite sure why I’m putting off the sweater spin. Part of this particular delay was because I’d just re-tied the drive band on my Schacht Reeves and wanted to make sure it was just right. Part of it was that I really just wanted to spin this colorway asap. I think another part of me is also a little nervous about the Big Sweater Spin though. I’ve set myself a lofty goal spinning for a Tecumseh sweater. Even though I know that if I don’t quite get the yarn right I’ll have no problem finding a pattern that will work, I am still a little worried I won’t get that yarn quite right. Because I want it to be right.

So I’ve been kind of sidling up to these fibers, waiting for my own trepidation to lift…

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For the fog to dissipate on my own vision & determination & motivation in this project. It’s all here, carefully curated; Grey for the main color, Iron Blue & Sunshiney Day for the contrasts. I just need to bring it out into the light and get working on it.

I woke up today and it was still warm, but there was not a bit of fog or haze. The light breeze meant the sun shone brightly. The fog has lifted and I think I’m seeing clearly. It’s time to wrap up my distractions and get a move on, I think.

27 thoughts on “Waiting For The Fog To Lift

  1. What lovely fog! I love how it softens everything. The current and future spins are lovely! I feel sure you can do this, control card at hand.

    1. I’m sure, too. DK has just always alluded me, at least spinning to DK on purpose. Worst case scenario I’ll hit a sport of worsted weight and find a different pattern to use, I suppose!

      1. My friend and spinning teacher says I can get any weight I want as long as I don’t care how many plies it is. 🙄 She has a point. Maybe spin your default but put an extra ply in it?

      2. I don’t have a default yarn! Honestly! I actually work hard not to! I think I’m super weird for that, but because I work in so many different weights all the time I don’t have one that is most comfortable any more. And I like it that way! I will fuss about it, but I’ll get there. I have time and patience on my side! And extra fiber just in case!

      3. Well, first of all, Mary Ann usually gets awfully close with her colorways between lots. And second, if I still have the first lot, I can mix the two before spinning. If the first is already spun, it’s not going to be anything different than different skeins of the same dye lot from somewhere like Malabrigo, so swapping skeins out at the end of the row totally works. In short, I just don’t worry about it. 🙂

      4. Sounds like a plan! I hope you have enough, though. So much easier.

        A woman in my knitting group was spinning today. Just enough to finish the last few inches of sleeve on her sweater.

  2. You guys go on the most wonderful adventures! I love seeing the fog lifting and the wildlife starting to appear. I just took a look at Tecumseh and understand why you want everything to be ‘just right’ for it. I love the design, the oversized fit, and the message. It’s going to be both a show-stopper and a sweater you will wear over and over. Now I want to make one – just don’t have the confidence level of that much colorwork – YET. When I do, this is what I’ll make. Now get going on that spin!

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